Covina Elder Abuse Lawyer

Covina Elder Abuse Lawyer

Elder abuse is a serious problem affecting victims across Covina each year. Our Covina Elder Abuse Lawyer gives free consultations and you will only pay a fee if we win your case! Call now at 310-651-7007 and speak to an attorney.

The Covina Elder Abuse Lawyer at Aidikoff Law represents individuals and their estates in claims against health-care facilities, long-term care facilities, nursing homes, hospice care providers and other assisted living providers for abuse, neglect and exploitation. We also pursue claims for financial fraud and abuse against broker-dealer and financial advertisement firms.

Call The Best Covina Elder Abuse Lawyer

If you have witnessed elder abuse, or one of your loved ones has been abused, you should consult a Covina Elder Abuse Lawyer. There are time-sensitive issues under the California Elder Abuse Law and Dependent Adult Civil Protection Act (EADACPA) that should be addressed. Call us today.

The following are indicators of abuse, neglect and exploitation for someone under care:

Signs of Abuse:

Unexplained bruises, welts, fractures, abrasions or lacerations

  • Multiple bruises in various stages of healing
  • Multiple/repeat injuries
  • Low self-esteem or loss of self determination
  • Withdrawn, passive
  • Fearful
  • Depressed, hopeless
  • Soiled linen or clothing
  • Social Isolation

Signs of Neglect:

  • Dehydration
  • Mal-nourishment
  • Inappropriate or soiled clothing
  • Odorous
  • Over/under medicated
  • Deserted, abandoned or unattended
  • Lack of medical necessities or assistive devices
  • Unclean environment
  • Social Isolation

Signs of Exploitation:

  • Missing/”disappearing” property
  • Inadequate living environment
  • Frequent/recent property title changes or will changes
  • Excessive home repair bills
  • Forced to sign over control of finances
  • No/limited money for food, clothes and other amenities

In addition, Los Angeles County, CA, has approximately 160,000 cases of elder and nursing home abuse every year, with most of these cases going unreported . Los Angeles County alone represents over 25% of all cases in California. Los Angeles is followed by Orange County at approximately 53,000 cases, or 8.4% of the state’s cases of elderly abuse. If you know someone who you believe has been or is being abused, call our Covina Elder Abuse Lawyer right now at 310-651-7007.

TYPES OF COVINA ELDERLY HOME CARE AGENCIES TO AVOID:

  1. Those that hire workers without a background check: Because an elderly person will be allowing someone in their home to assist them, it is very important that they know whether or not that person has been convicted of crimes in the past.
  2. Those that hire ex-convicts: If a company does background checks but still hires ex-convicts, individuals looking to hire a homecare worker should not do business with them, for obvious reasons.
  3. Those with a history of elderly abuse or theft: If certain companies are known for having workers on staff that abuse or steal from elderly clients, these are businesses that an individual will not want to work with. Conduct proper due diligence on any homecare service provider you are considering using. You would be surprised at how many care providers have a reputation for abuse and exploitation that could be easily discovered if you do your homework.

Call Our Office Today For A Free Consultation At 310-651-7007.

About Covina:

Present day Covina was originally within the homelands of the indigenous Tongva people for 5,000 to 8,000 years. In the 18th century it the became part of Rancho La Puente in Alta California, a 1770s Spanish colonial and 1842 Mexican land grants.

The city of Covina was founded in 1882 by Joseph Swift Phillips, on a 2,000-acre (8.1 km2) tract that was purchased from the holdings of John Edward Hollenbeck, one of the 1842 grantees of Rancho La Puente. In 1875 Hollenbeck had purchased a failed coffee plantation from 3 Costa Rican brothers, Pedro Maria Badilla, Julian Badilla, and Pedro Antonio Badilla, the latter who purchased it from the heirs of Hollenbeck’s 1842 co-grantee John A. Rowland.

The City of Covina was named by a young engineer, Frederick Eaton, who was hired by Phillips to survey the area. Impressed by the way in which the valleys of the adjacent San Gabriel Mountains formed a natural cove around the vineyards that had been planted by the region’s earlier pioneers, Eaton merged the words “cove” and “vine”, and in 1885, created the name Covina for the new township.

The city was incorporated in 1901, the townsite being bounded by Puente Street on the south, 1st Avenue on the east, the alley north of College Street on the north, & 4th Avenue on the west. The city’s slogan, “One Mile Square and All There”, was coined by Mrs F. E. Wolfarth, the winner of a 1922 slogan contest sponsored by the chamber of commerce, when the incorporated area of the city was only (some say slightly less than) one square mile, making it the smallest city in area in the country.

About Cudahy:

Cudahy is named for its founder, meat-packing baron Michael Cudahy, who purchased the original 2,777 acres (11.2 km2) of Rancho San Antonio in 1908 to resell as 1-acre (4,000 m2) lots. These “Cudahy lots” were notable for their dimensions—in most cases, 50 to 100 feet (15 to 30 m) in width and 600 to 800 feet (183 to 244 m) in depth, a length equivalent to a city block or more in most American towns. Such parcels, often referred to as “railroad lots”, were intended to allow the new town’s residents to keep a large vegetable garden, a grove of fruit trees (usually citrus), and a chicken coop or horse stable. This arrangement, popular in the towns along the lower Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers, proved particularly attractive to the Southerners and Midwesterners who were leaving their struggling farms in droves in the 1910s and 1920s to start new lives in Southern California. Sam Quinones of the Los Angeles Times said that the large, narrow parcels of land gave Cudahy Acres a “rural feel in an increasingly urban swath.” As late as the 1950s, some Cudahy residents were still riding into the city’s downtown areas on horseback. After World War II the city was a White American blue collar town with steel and automobile plants in the area.

By the late 1970s, the factories closed down and the white American residents of Cudahy left for jobs and housing in the San Gabriel and San Fernando Valleys. Stucco apartment complexes were built on former tracts of land. The population density increased; in 2007 the city was the second-densest in California, after Maywood.

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