Compton Elder Abuse Lawyer

Compton Elder Abuse Lawyer

Elder abuse is a serious problem affecting victims across Compton each year. Our Compton Elder Abuse Lawyer gives free consultations and you will only pay a fee if we win your case! Call now at 310-651-7007 and speak to an attorney.

The Compton Elder Abuse Lawyer at Aidikoff Law represents individuals and their estates in claims against health-care facilities, long-term care facilities, nursing homes, hospice care providers and other assisted living providers for abuse, neglect and exploitation. We also pursue claims for financial fraud and abuse against broker-dealer and financial advertisement firms.

Call The Best Compton Elder Abuse Lawyer

If you have witnessed elder abuse, or one of your loved ones has been abused, you should consult a Compton Elder Abuse Lawyer. There are time-sensitive issues under the California Elder Abuse Law and Dependent Adult Civil Protection Act (EADACPA) that should be addressed. Call us today.

The following are indicators of abuse, neglect and exploitation for someone under care:

Signs of Abuse:

Unexplained bruises, welts, fractures, abrasions or lacerations

  • Multiple bruises in various stages of healing
  • Multiple/repeat injuries
  • Low self-esteem or loss of self determination
  • Withdrawn, passive
  • Fearful
  • Depressed, hopeless
  • Soiled linen or clothing
  • Social Isolation

Signs of Neglect:

  • Dehydration
  • Mal-nourishment
  • Inappropriate or soiled clothing
  • Odorous
  • Over/under medicated
  • Deserted, abandoned or unattended
  • Lack of medical necessities or assistive devices
  • Unclean environment
  • Social Isolation

Signs of Exploitation:

  • Missing/”disappearing” property
  • Inadequate living environment
  • Frequent/recent property title changes or will changes
  • Excessive home repair bills
  • Forced to sign over control of finances
  • No/limited money for food, clothes and other amenities

In addition, Los Angeles County, CA, has approximately 160,000 cases of elder and nursing home abuse every year, with most of these cases going unreported . Los Angeles County alone represents over 25% of all cases in California. Los Angeles is followed by Orange County at approximately 53,000 cases, or 8.4% of the state’s cases of elderly abuse. If you know someone who you believe has been or is being abused, call our Compton Elder Abuse Lawyer right now at 310-651-7007.

TYPES OF COMPTON ELDERLY HOME CARE AGENCIES TO AVOID:

  1. Those that hire workers without a background check: Because an elderly person will be allowing someone in their home to assist them, it is very important that they know whether or not that person has been convicted of crimes in the past.
  2. Those that hire ex-convicts: If a company does background checks but still hires ex-convicts, individuals looking to hire a homecare worker should not do business with them, for obvious reasons.
  3. Those with a history of elderly abuse or theft: If certain companies are known for having workers on staff that abuse or steal from elderly clients, these are businesses that an individual will not want to work with. Conduct proper due diligence on any homecare service provider you are considering using. You would be surprised at how many care providers have a reputation for abuse and exploitation that could be easily discovered if you do your homework.

Call Our Office Today For A Free Consultation At 310-651-7007.

About Compton:

In 1784, the Spanish Crown deeded a tract of over 75,000 acres (300 km2) to Juan Jose Dominguez in this area. The tract was named Rancho San Pedro. Dominguez’s name was later applied to the Dominguez Hills community south of Compton. The tree that marked the original northern boundary of the rancho still stands at the corner of Poppy and Short streets. The rancho was subdivided and parcels were sold within the Californios of Alta California until the lands were ceded after the Mexican-American war in 1848. American immigrants acquired most of the rancho lands after 1848.

In 1867, Griffith Dickenson Compton led a group of 30 pioneers to the area. These families had traveled by wagon train south from Stockton, California in search of ways to earn a living other than in the rapid exhaustion of gold fields. Originally named Gibsonville, after one of the tract owners, it was later called Comptonville. However, to avoid confusion with the Comptonville located in Yuba County, the name was shortened to Compton. Compton’s earliest settlers were faced with terrible hardships as they farmed the land in bleak weather to get by with just the barest subsistence. The weather continued to be harsh, rainy and cold, and fuel was difficult to find. To gather firewood it was necessary to travel to mountains close to Pasadena. The round trip took almost a week. Many in the Compton party wanted to relocate to a friendlier climate and settle down, but as there were two general stores within traveling distance—one in the pueblo of Los Angeles, the other in Wilmington—they eventually decided to stay put.

By 1887, the settlers realized it was time to make improvements to the local government. A series of town meetings were held to discuss incorporation of their little town. Griffith D. Compton donated his land to incorporate and create the city of Compton in 1889, but he did stipulate that a certain acreage be zoned solely for agriculture and named Richland Farms. In January 1888, a petition supporting the incorporation of Compton was forwarded to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, who in turn forwarded the petition to the State Legislature. On May 11, 1888 the city of Compton was incorporated with a population of 500 people. The first City Council meeting was held on May 14, 1888.

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